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Skeptical Theism New Essays On Moby

Skeptical Theism: New Essays

Trent Dougherty and Justin P. McBrayer

Abstract

Given that we meet evils in every quarter of the world, could it be governed by an all-good and all-powerful deity? Some philosophers say no and claim that the problem of evil is good evidence for atheism. Other philosophers say yes and claim that all of the evils in our world can be explained as requirements for deeper goods. And still other philosophers say yes but demur on the task of explaining the role of evils in our world. Philosophers who believe in God and yet take this latter route are called “skeptical theists.” Such thinkers are skeptical about human abilities to determine whether ... More

Given that we meet evils in every quarter of the world, could it be governed by an all-good and all-powerful deity? Some philosophers say no and claim that the problem of evil is good evidence for atheism. Other philosophers say yes and claim that all of the evils in our world can be explained as requirements for deeper goods. And still other philosophers say yes but demur on the task of explaining the role of evils in our world. Philosophers who believe in God and yet take this latter route are called “skeptical theists.” Such thinkers are skeptical about human abilities to determine whether the evils in our world could be justifiably allowed by a being such as God. Despite believing in God, these philosophers insist that humans are not cognitively equipped to discern many of the reasons that might be available to God. This collection of essays presents cutting-edge work on skeptical theistic responses to the problem of evil and the persistent objections that such responses invite. Part I investigates the epistemology of skepticism as it applies to evils and the nature of epistemic humility. Part II explores the tenability of a particular epistemic principle about the conditions of reasonable epistemic access (CORNEA). The remaining sections of the book address objections to sceptical theism, namely the objection that skeptical theism undermines the theistic life (Part III) and the objection that skeptical theism undermines the moral life (Part IV).

Keywords: skeptical theism, God, evil, problem of evil, epistemic humility, CORNEA, evidence, Bayes’s theorem, belief revision, theodicy

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2014Print ISBN-13: 9780199661183
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2014DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199661183.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Trent Dougherty, editor
Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Baylor University

Justin P. McBrayer, editor
Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Fort Lewis College

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Preface
Acknowledgements
Part I: Knowledge & Epistemic Humility
1: Phenomenal Conservatism and Skeptical Theism, Jonathan Matheson
2: Phenomenal Conservatism, Skeptical Theism, and Probabilistic Reasoning, Trent Dougherty
3: On the Epistemological Framework for Skeptical Theism, John DePoe
4: Why Skeptical Theism isn't Skeptical Enough, Chris Tucker
5: Minimal Skeptical Theism, Todd R. Long
6: Replies to Long and Tucker, E.J. Coffman
7: The Paradox of Humility and Dogmatism, N.N. Trakakis
Part II: Debating CORNEA
8: Some Considerations Concerning CORNEA, Global Skepticism, and Trust, Kenneth Boyce
9: Skeptical Theism and Undercutting Defeat, M.J. Almeida
10: Confirmation Theory and the Core of CORNEA, Paul Draper
11: Skeptical Theism, Abductive Atheology, and Theory Versioning, Timothy Perrine & Stephen J. Wykstra
12: Meet the New Skeptical Theism, Same as the Old Skeptical Theism, Paul Draper
13: Learning not to be Naïve: A comment on the exchange between Perrine/Wykstra & Draper, Lara Buchack
Part III: Skeptical Theism's Implications for Theism
14: Skeptical Theism and Skeptical Atheism, J.L. Schellenberg
15: Skeptical Theism, Atheism, and Total Evidence Skepticism, Michael Bergmann
16: Skeptical Demonism: A Failed Response to a Humean Challenge, Wes Morriston
17: Divine Deception, Erik J. Wielenberg
18: Two New Versions of Skeptical Theism, Andrew Cullison
19: Trust, Silence, and Liturgical Acts, Kevin Timpe
Part IV: Skeptical Theism's Implications for Morality
20: Agnosticism, Skeptical Theism, and Moral Obligation, Stephen Maitzen
21: Agnosticism, the Moral Skepticism Objection, and Commonsense Morality, Daniel Howard-Snyder
22: Skeptical Theism within Reason, Ted Poston

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